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The opioid epidemic sweeping the nation affects the most vulnerable among us - newborn babies. Yet opioid pregnancies are COMPLETELY PREVENTABLE. Find out how we're helping prevent opioid pregnancies and protecting Tennessee's mothers and their babies.

Browse our videos and FAQ to learn more about opioid pregnancies and prevention.

FAQ

  • Does the U.S. consume a large amount of the world’s opiate supply?

    YES – the U.S. has only 4% of world’s population but consumes 50% of the world’s opiate supply.

     

     Source: http://www.painpolicy.wisc.edu/global, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Pain & Policy Studies Group, Global Opioid Consumption, 2014

  • What are the risks associated with opioid use during pregnancy?

    Opioid use during pregnancy can contribute to a number of adverse maternal and infant outcomes including, but not limited to, premature delivery, low birth weight, and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).

     

     Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3052960/, Sarah H. Heil, Ph.D.., Hendree E. Jones, Ph.D., Amelia Arria, Ph.D., Karol Kaltenbach, Ph.D.,  Mara Coyle, M.D., Gabriele Fischer, M.D, Susan Stine, M.D., Ph. D, Peter Selby, M.D., Peter R. Martin, M.D., “Unintended Pregnancy in Opioid-Abusing Women”, J Subst Abuse Treat. 2011 March; 40(2): 199-202

  • What are the medical and societal costs of opioid births in Tennessee?

    In Tennessee, 1 in 9 births are preterm.  According to CDC and TennCare statistics, there are approximately 11,000 opioid births per year.  Medical costs alone exceed $400 million in the infants’ first year.  Additional agency costs for these children exceeds $600 million.

     

    Sources: March of Dimes, CDC, TennCare, Tennessee Office of the Comptroller

     

  • In Tennessee, are women taking opioids using contraceptives?

    In 2014, 85% of TennCare women on opioids were not using a prescribed contraceptive.

    In 2016, 160,541 TennCare women received an opioid prescription; but only 5,455 (3.4%) of these women also received a long acting reversible contraceptive.

     

     Source: https://www.tn.gov/assets/entities/tenncare/attachments/TennCareNASData2014.pdf, TN Division of Health Care & Finance Administration, Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome among TennCare enrollees – 2014 data

    Also: Bureau of TennCare, TN Division of HealthCare Finance & Administration, 2017-03-29

     

  • Do women on TennCare have more babies than "non-TennCare" women?

    YES– TennCare women have 4 times more babies than non-TennCare women.

    Opioid-dependent women become pregnant more often than women in the general population. In a seminal study of the reproductive health of opioid-dependent women, 54% reported having 4 or more pregnancies in their lifetime compared to 14% of a nationally representative sample of US women.2

     

    Source: https://www.tn.gov/assets/entities/tenncare/attachments/TennCareNASData2014.pdf, TN Division of Health Care & Finance Administration, Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome among TennCare enrollees – 2014 data

    Also: Bureau of TennCare, TN Division of HealthCare Finance & Administration, 2017-03-29

  • Are women in addiction treatment knowledgeable about birth control?

    NO – In a 2015 UT study, TennCare women in addiction treatment scored only 24% correct answers on general birth control knowledge quiz.

     

    Source: https://www.tn.gov/assets/entities/health/attachments/2015_KCHD_Risks_and_Facilitating_Factors_for_Contraception_Use.pdf, Knox County Health Department, “2015 Risk and Facilitating Factors of Contraception Use among Female Methadone Clinic Patients”

     

  • Is pregnancy among opioid-dependent women intentional?

    NO – Almost 90% of women screened reported that their current pregnancy was unintended. This rate is 2-3 times higher than the general population. In addition, opioid-dependent women are almost 5 times more likely to have an abortion than the general population.

     

    Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3052960/, Sarah H. Heil, Ph.D.., Hendree E. Jones, Ph.D., Amelia Arria, Ph.D., Karol Kaltenbach, Ph.D.,  Mara Coyle, M.D., Gabriele Fischer, M.D, Susan Stine, M.D., Ph. D, Peter Selby, M.D., Peter R. Martin, M.D., “Unintended Pregnancy in Opioid-Abusing Women”, J Subst Abuse Treat. 2011 March; 40(2): 199-202

     

  • What impact does Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) have on Tennessee communities?

    It’s very negative – In 2014, 18.9% of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome babies born to TennCare women ended up in DCS custody within the first 12 months of their birth. In comparison, only 1% of all TennCare babies ended up in DCS custody within the first 12 months of their birth.

     

    Source: https://www.tn.gov/assets/entities/tenncare/attachments/TennCareNASData2014.pdf, TN Division of Health Care & Finance Administration, Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome among TennCare enrollees – 2014 data

    Also: Bureau of TennCare, TN Division of HealthCare Finance & Administration, 2017-03-29

     

  • Is Long-acting, reversible contraception (LARC) effective?

    YES – LARC, which includes both the implant device and the intrauterine device (IUD), is more than 99% effective in preventing pregnancy – the same as a tubal ligation, except LARC is reversible.

     

    Source: https://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/contraception/index.htm, Effectiveness of Contraception

VTM’s technology and services are being used to provide women at risk with:

Education about NAS

 

Education about birth control options, including long-acting, reversible contraception

 

Referrals to health care providers (if appropriate), with follow-up and coordination to remove any barriers to care.

VTM LLC.

618 Grassmere Park Dr. Suite 12A

Nashville, TN 37211

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info@vtm2020.com

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